Bohemian Rhapsody

Sorry about heading, but I couldn’t resist. I was featured as the cover story in this week’s edition of my local Sonoma newspaper, the North Bay Bohemian, which was especially fun because of the cover’s vertiginous artwork. Other media highlights this month include being interviewed about YouTube on BBC’s Culture Show and critiquing Silicon Valley transparency on the Kulturzeit, the German ZDF/3sat tv program.  Also check out my recent TechcrunchTV interviews with the smart economist Tyler Cowen and Internet Hall of Famer Brewster Kahle.

I’ve been doing a lot of public speaking in the last few weeks too. I’m just back from a tour of Asia – having given speeches about digital disruption in Kuala Lumpur and at the Rappler/Google Big Data event in Manila . And i’m returning to Asia this coming week, keynoting the Singapore Fix Conference on Thursday, where I’ll be talking about the impact of the digital revolution on the financial industry. Earlier this month, I also had the honor of being the featured speaker at the opening convocation at New Jersey’s Rampapo College. All 900 students in Rampapo’s freshman class read Digital Vertigo with one or two even agreeing with it.

I’ll also be speaking at Creative Convergence Silicon Valley (C2SV) in San Jose on September 26 and then moderating a panel about wearable computing at the Glazed Conference in San Francisco on September 30. I hope to see some you somewhere in the next couple of weeks so that we can figure out if this is the real life or just fantasy.

Against fireside chats

I’m currently deep in the tropics of Washington DC, speaking tomorrow, June 4, at the modestly named World Creators Summit about how to immodestly monetize one’s creativity in the digital age. This coming Thursday, June 6, I’m back in the chilly Bay Area, doing a “fireside chat” (how I hate that term) with David Helgason, CEO of United Technologies, at the Nordic Start-Up evening. Then, next week, I fly to Seoul where I’m speaking at Sparks Labs NEXT conference on June 14. Other speakers at NEXT include Richard Florida and Ray Ozzie, so – if you happen to be in north-east Asia in the middle of next week – do say hello, it promises to be a really fun event.

After that, I’m back home to prepare to interview the stimulating and controversial Vivek Wadhwa for our next FutureCast event on June 25 at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto. Vivek will talk about the future of work, innovation, immigration, and (the lack of) female leadership in Silicon Valley. With an exclusive audience of top entrepreneurs, investors, technologists and writers, this promises to be at least as memorable as our first highly interactive salon-style FutureCast event about the future of transportation in April. Please let me know if you like to be considered for an invitation.

Mercifully, we don’t allow fireside chats on my “Keen On” TechcrunchTV show. So check out my TCTV conversations with two of the most brilliant minds in technology – Jaron Lanier and Stephen Wolfram – whose perspectives on big data couldn’t be more different. Also, if you have a minute, please have a look at my uncharacteristically generous review of Eric Schmidt’s new book The New Digital Age.

Introducing FutureCast

I’m thrilled to be producing FutureCast, a salon-style event hosted by AT&T and Ericsson, which brings together some of Silicon Valley’s finest minds to discuss the digital revolution. Each event, held at AT&T’s spectacular Palo Alto Foundry, invites a select group of entrepreneurs, investors, writers and executives to talk about the ways in which networked technology is radically changing education, cities, healthcare and every other aspect of 21st century life.

Our first event focused on transportation. FutureCast guests included executives from transportation companies such as GM, Tesla, American Airlines, San Francisco Municipal Transporation Authority and Sidecar as well as Silicon Valley notables like Frost and Sullivan chairman David Frigstad, distinguished New York Times science correspondent John Markoff, EFF Chairman Brad Templeton, Techcrunch co-founder Keith Teare, Geek Squad founder Robert Stephens and best selling business writer Larry Downes. This is how AT&T CTO John Donovan reported it. CNN covered the event in this five part video series:

Transportation’s Kodak Moment
The Driverless Car
Are We Falling Out Of Love With Our Cars?
Privacy & The Connected Car
The Global View

Our next FutureCast, featuring the controversial Silicon Valley author and entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa, will address how the networked revolution is radically changing the economics of work, with a special focus on Wadhwa’s signature issues such as immigration reform. This event, once again held at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto, is scheduled for the evening of Tuesday June 25. Please let me know if you’d like to be considered for an invitation.

My Italian Job

My third favorite all-time movie is The Italian Job (behind Vertigo & Shadow of a Doubt). I even managed to squeeze a reference about it into Digital Vertigo (the scene in the Oxford jail). So it’s appropriate that I’m about to embark on my own lower case italian job to celebrate the publication of the Italian version of Vertigine Digitale.  Beginning April 28, I’ll be in Perugia, Milan, Venice, Bologna and (for my sins) Capri where I’ll be speaking at an event about trend setting. Here’s the full schedule of “Il Tour Di Andrew Keen In Italia”.

Before Italy, I’ll be at my favorite European tech conference – The Next Web extravaganza in Amsterdam. This coming Thursday, I’m doing a debate with my best enemy, Robert Scoble, about Google Glass. Given that Scoble is now wearing his all-seeing Glass in public urinals, our debate might turn out to be quite a pissing contest. Then on Friday, I’ll be interviewing my old friend Gary Shapiro, CEA President and the author of the best-selling Ninja Innovation.

Please also check out my CNN piece this week on the potentially positive impact of networked technology on autism. And to temper such uncharacteristic optimism, you might also enjoy my latest TCTV interview with Silicon Valley arch-critic Evgeny Morozov.

See you in Capri.